CPAG Blog

Children of austerity

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Thanks to the UNICEF Office for Research a book has been published today tracing what happened to children in rich countries following the financial crisis:

B Cantillon, Y Chzhen, S Handa and B Nolan, Children of Austerity: impact of the great recession on child poverty in rich countries, Oxford: OUP, 2017.

UK household food insecurity: the importance of income

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Stark new food insecurity statistics highlight how many young people and those on low incomes are struggling to get enough food to eat.

Eight things you should know about the benefit cap

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‘Fairness’ was the word Lord Freud used to justify the lowering of the benefit cap. But there is no fairness to be found in a policy that ignores assessed need, mostly affects people who can’t work to increase their income, and hits households with children in 93 per cent of cases.

Why March really was miserable for child poverty

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It’s been an awful month for UK child poverty but Iain Duncan Smith’s Centre for Social Justice (CSJ) has published some rather questionable claims made about the way we measure and use child poverty statistics.

Is rising child poverty a price worth paying to protect our children?

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Today’s awful figures tells us several things. Child poverty is high. It’s rising – it’s jumped to 4 million. Two thirds of poor children come from working families. But perhaps the main lesson to take away is that we need to call time on the unfathomable Whitehall orthodoxy, driven by George Osborne but still in place under Theresa May, that rising child poverty is a price worth paying to protect our children.

Why this week's child poverty figures help explain last's budget

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For a Prime Minister who walked into Downing Street decrying the ‘burning injustice’ of poverty and contrasting the opportunities available to some children but not others, there was a disappointing omission in last week’s budget: child poverty.

Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

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Today’s Guardian covered new analysis by CPAG and IPPR on the impact of cuts to universal credit. This analysis shows that universal credit cuts will hit families with children hardest, and will be poverty-producing to the tune of around a million children (comparing universal credit as originally designed with its current form).

A lot can happen in 6 weeks

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If you didn't have any money coming in for six weeks, could you and your family cope? Would you be able to pay the rent, the supermarket trip, the school meals?

Damning proof that the government has no evidence benefits sanctions work

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The National Audit Office says the government has failed to measure whether sanctioning benefit claimants represents value for money.

A ‘tax’ on work?

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Universal Credit, the new benefit for families on low incomes, was claimed to have huge potential to reduce child poverty, incentivise work and make life easier for struggling families.