CPAG Blog

How the rising cost of essentials has tightened the squeeze on family incomes


Share

"New research suggests that benefit cuts, harsher benefit rules and the rising costs of essentials are all hitting poor families in the UK at the same time. This can only serve to reinforce the urgency of making sure people on low incomes are protected." 

Our programme for the 2015 government

Share

Whoever wins on May 7 will be confronted by a child poverty crisis. That’s why CPAG today publishes its Programme for Government, a document setting out what the next Government must do to put the UK on track to end child poverty.

Read CPAG’s Programme for Government.

Supreme Court splits the baby over the benefit cap

Share

This blog was first posted on the UK Human Rights Blog.

The Supreme Court was sharply divided yesterday over whether the benefit cap breaches the Human Rights Act. The controversial cap limits the total amount of benefits an out-of-work family can receive, including housing benefit and benefits for children, to £500 per week. It is applied regardless of family size or circumstances such as rental costs. As a result, lone parents with children in large families are disproportionately affected, both because they are more likely to be hit by the cap and because they are less likely to be able to avoid its effects.

What was missing from the 2015 Budget? Anything to do with child poverty


Share

'This was a "see no poverty, hear no poverty" budget from a government in denial.

The Chancellor made claim to a truly national recovery throughout his speech but this is a ‘See no poverty, Hear no poverty’ Budget which continues to leave children and the low paid behind.

Poor children are invisible in this election


Share

Back in the early 2000s, ‘child poverty’ was the term on every politician’s lips. The lead up to the Child Poverty Act in 2010 achieved cross-party consensus on the necessity of eradicating child poverty by 2020. These days, enthusiasm to give children in poverty the attention they deserve seems more muted.

What is happening to discretionary housing payments?


Share

If you had heard the Minister for Disabled People, Mark Harper, reassuring MP on Monday this week about future funding levels of Discretionary Housing Payments (which help vulnerable families hit by housing benefit cuts to meet their rent payments and prevent homelessness), you would be forgiven for believing that, on this issue, the Government was making adequate resources available to meet needs. And no-one would blame you for not realising that funding for this lifeline has been cut by 24% for next year.

The limits of Universal Credit


Share

This article originally appeared in the Bright Blue and the Fabian's publication A future without poverty.

Since 2010 the Government has overseen an ambitious, large-scale programme of income redistribution.

Sanctions under scrutiny

Share

When MPs on the Commons Work and Pensions Committee sat down to take evidence in the second instalment of their inquiry on sanctions yesterday, two media stories hung in the air.

The importance of local welfare assistance

Maria is one of thousands of parents up and down the country who have received support from their council through local welfare provision funding. She was living with her abusive partner and her child, with no access to the household’s money, and no family in the country.

Child poverty in 2014

Read our story of the highs and lows for children in 2014.