Josephine Tucker's blog

Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

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Today’s Guardian covered new analysis by CPAG and IPPR on the impact of cuts to universal credit. This analysis shows that universal credit cuts will hit families with children hardest, and will be poverty-producing to the tune of around a million children (comparing universal credit as originally designed with its current form).

Widening the net and twisting the knife: the benefit cap gets worse

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Today sees the benefit cap – the limit on total benefits which households can receive if no-one works at least 16 hours a week – fall from £26,000 a year to £20,000, or £23,000 in London. The 20,000 or so families currently capped will see their housing benefit reduced overnight by £500 or £250 a month, starting from today. That’s a huge amount to expect people to find from their other income, but most will have to do that or risk losing their home. For new households, the cap will be introduced in phases starting with local authorities with the fewest affected households and finishing with those with the most (such as Birmingham) in February 2017.

What Brexit could mean for child poverty

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Two weeks ago, while all eyes were elsewhere, the government published the latest UK poverty statistics. They showed that 200,000 more children are in poverty compared to last year.

Fancy working a 14 month year? The real impact of UC work allowance cuts

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Anyone following the story of Universal Credit’s painfully delayed roll-out will already be familiar with its time-bending qualities, but this month’s cuts to its work allowances mean that many hard-pressed parents now need to work a thirteen- or fourteen-month year just to protect current income levels. 

Frozen out: government’s silent treatment on Welfare Reform and Work Bill

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Last week the Welfare Reform and Work Bill entered committee stage in the House of Lords.

What does blue-collar Conservatism look like?

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This was the question facing a panel convened by Bright Blue and the Child Poverty Action Group at a fringe event I attended at the Conservative Party Conference this week. Josephine Tucker reports.

After the 2015 election the Prime Minister promised ‘blue-collar Conservatism’, which he said was about 'giving everyone in our country the chance to get on, with the dignity of a job, the pride of a pay cheque, a home of their own and the security and peace of mind that comes from being able to support a family’.