benefits for children

  • Two child limit challenge

    Last updated: October 17, 2017
    test case

    Update - 17 October 2017 - permission has been granted for CPAG to apply for judicial review of the two child limit and the case will now go forward to a full hearing.

    On 18 August 2017 CPAG issued a claim for judicial review in the High Court against the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (SSWP) to challenge the two child limit, introduced by the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016.

    On 6 April 2017, new rules came into force limiting the child element of child tax credit (CTC) and universal credit (UC) awards to two children. In CTC, this limit only applies to a third or subsequent child born on or after 6 April 2017; in UC the limit applies from 6 April 2017 (irrespective of when the child was born) though transitional protection applies to third or subsequent children born before 6 April 2017. There are a limited number of exceptions to this 2 child limit meaning that it does not apply to a third or subsequent child in the following circumstances: multiple births, adoption from local authority care, kinship care and children likely to have been conceived as a result of rape or a coercive or controlling relationship.

  • Refugee children – Disability Living Allowance – past presence test

    Last updated: May 24, 2017
    test case

    Update 09/09/2016: the DWP has now issued guidance, DMG Memo 20/16 and ADM Memo 21/16, confirming that it will not be appealing against the Upper Tribunal decision and that the past presence test is no longer applicable to claims for disability living allowance, personal independence payment, attendance allowance or carer's allowance.

  • Past presence test and aggregation rules

    Last updated: May 23, 2017
    test case

     Kavanagh v Secretary of State and Pensions CDLA/373/2016

    This appeal concerns the application of the ‘past presence’ test that requires disability benefit claimants to be resident in Great Britain for 104 weeks out of the 156 weeks prior to the claim. However, for claimants to whom an EU regulation applies, the past presence test is disapplied if they can establish a genuine and sufficient link to the UK social security system. Alternatively, they can seek to satisfy the 2 year rule by aggregating qualifying periods spent in another EU country under Article 6 of EU Regulation 883/2004. EU Regulation 883/2004 coordinates social security systems in the EU and Article 6 provides that certain periods of time spent in one member state can be aggregated when considering presence tests in another.

  • Benefits for disabled children and their families

    Level: Basic

    training course

    This half-day course offers practical advice both on checking that a family is getting all they should and on how you can help make claims effectively. It aims to help you recognise important issues, and equip you to advise directly or refer for specialist advice.

    Read more
  • The Welfare Reform and Work Bill and human rights

    Issue 250 (February 2016)
    article

    The Welfare Reform and Work Bill, if passed into law, will have a significant impact on claimants (for an overview, see Bulletin 247). Mike Spencer and Sophie Earnshaw consider whether its more controversial measures would comply with human rights law.

  • Income maximisation for families

    Level: Basic

    training course

    This half-day course looks at changes to benefits for people starting a family and families with young children, both in and out of work.

    Maximising income in the early years is vital for children’s health, education and development. This course aims to give frontline workers a basic awareness to help you to identify problems and refer on where appropriate.

    The course covers:

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    Dates:
  • Kinship care, looked-after children and the benefits system


    training course

    This course looks at benefit issues where there is social work involvement with a child and their family. It covers kinship care and children looked after by the local authority away from home or away from birth parents eg, in a residential unit or with foster carers.

    It provides an opportunity to consider the implications of recent changes in kinship care assistance and look at the new Scottish Government guidance, Support for Kinship Care. Participants will also have a chance to look at what universal credit means for kinship carers and for local authorities.

    Read more
  • Evidence, education and extra needs: DLA and children

    Issue 245 (April 2015)
    article

    Despite the introduction of personal independence payment, the Upper Tribunal continues to consider important issues in relation to disability living allowance (DLA). Jon Shaw looks at some recent cases with implications for children’s entitlement.

  • The cost of a child in 2014

    August 2014
    briefing

    Today we publish our third annual report ‘The Cost of a Child in 2014’, written by Donald Hirsch from the Centre for Research in Social Policy at Loughborough University and funded by JRF. It draws on the Minimum Income Standard project (MIS) to establish how much families need to cover their basic needs like food, clothes and shelter, and to participate in society.

  • Guide to welfare reforms for local authority staff and their partners


    page

    A (long) plain language guide to welfare reforms for local authority staff and their partners

    A wide reaching programme of welfare reform is underway that will have a significant impact on child poverty levels across local authorities. The scope of the welfare reform programme is broad, and a number of reforms will affect a variety of family types, and for many households, these effects will be cumulative.