Budget

  • DHPs – principle and practice

    Issue 250 (February 2016)
    article

    Gwyneth King considers the role of discretionary housing payments (DHPs) in mitigating some of the effects of cuts contained in welfare reform measures.

  • 'Budget action on minimum wage and family benefits needed to tackle living standards crisis' say child poverty campaigners

    March 2014
    briefing
    • AME cap on benefits and tax credits could drive up child poverty
    • Additional childcare support welcome, but must not come at cost of wider family support
    • Living standards in crisis as ‘cost of a child’ rises faster than wages, inflation and family benefits

    Speaking ahead of the UK Budget Statement tomorrow (19th March) John Dickie, the head of the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) in Scotland John Dickie said;

  • 'Budget locks in poverty producing cuts' say child poverty campaigners

    March 19, 2014
    press release
    • Lower income families continue to shoulder burden of 'austerity'
    • Family living standards face continued crisis as ‘cost of a child’ rises faster than wages, inflation and family benefits

    Responding to the UK Budget Statement today (19th March) John Dickie, the head of the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) in Scotland John Dickie said;

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  • 2010 Budget highlights

    Issue 215 (April 2010)
    article

    David Simmons summarises the main changes relating to welfare benefits and tax credits announced in the 2010 budget.1These are in addition to the changes already announced in the Pre-Budget Report.

  • Blog: Looking at the tax credits cuts ahead of the Autumn Statement

    24 November 2015
    news

    Read our blog by Kirsty McKechnie, Welfare Rights Worker, on tax credits cuts ahead of the Autumn Statement here.

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  • Budget 2014: Child Poverty Action Group on the impact on families

    March 19, 2014
    press release

    Responding to the Chancellor’s Budget Statement today Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “Today’s Budget tries to lock-in austerity for millions of low-paid families, poor children, carers and disabled people. Announcing a cap for social security spending without a plan to address the root causes of low pay, high rents and high childcare costs, simply forces the most vulnerable in society to pay the price for inaction.

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  • Budget a “huge disappointment” say child poverty campaigners – children get “less each week than cost of a pint of milk”

    April 22, 2009
    press release

    John Dickie, head of the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) in Scotland today expressed “huge disappointment” at today’s Budget Statement by the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

    "This Budget is a huge disappointment for the quarter of a million children still living in poverty across Scotland. The money targeted on children amounts to less each week than the cost of a pint of milk.”

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  • Budget and benefits 2007

    Issue 197 (April 2007)
    article

    Simon Osborne describes the main benefit and tax credit provisions in the 2007 Budget, as set out in the Budget Report.

  • Budget fails Scotland’s poorest children

    March 24, 2010
    press release

    Commenting on the Chancellor’s Budget Statement, John Dickie, Head of the Child Poverty Action Group in Scotland, said:

    “Today’s Budget fails Scotland’s poorest children, as it does children across the UK. The extra investment in Child Tax Credit for infants from 2012 is welcome but is a tip toe rather than the stride needed to end child poverty by 2020.

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  • Budget leaves poorest families abandoned on the frontline of austerity

    March 20, 2013
    press release

    Responding to today’s Budget Statement, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty action Group, said:

    “The Chancellor described it as a budget for families with children looking to work hard and aspiring to get on, but most low income families have very few reasons to be cheerful and plenty to be fearful. Child poverty is set to increase by 600,000 children during the Coalition’s time in office, and there is nothing much in the Budget that will change this course.

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