child poverty

  • Overhyped Budget does little for families

    April 27, 2012
    press release

    Key points from Budget 2012:

    Read more
  • Promoting fairness? Lowering the benefit cap will push more families into poverty

    Share

    This autumn the benefit cap will be cut, squeezing low-income families even further and pushing more people into poverty. The Welfare Reform & Work Act 2016 lowers the cap to £23,000 per annum for families (or £15,410 for single claimants) in London and £20,000 for families (or £13,400 for single claimants) outside of London. There are currently 3.9 million children living in poverty. Projections from the Institute for Fiscal Studies suggests that child poverty could rise by 50 per cent by 2020. Tightening the cap and taking away more support from low-income households will have a devastating effect on families and children.

  • QUEEN’S SPEECH: CHILD POVERTY ACTION GROUP RESPONSE

    June 21, 2017
    press release
    • Welcome shelving of plans to cut universal free school meals
    • No plans for tackling rising child poverty, despite promise to tackle ‘burning injustice’ of poverty
    • Urgent need for a coherent social justice agenda

    Alison Garnham, Chief Executive:

    “We welcome the commitments to strengthen rights at work and the minimum wage for over 25-year-olds, but this is a Queen's Speech conspicuous for what it doesn’t mention and suggests the Government is missing a serious and coherent social justice agenda.

    Read more
  • Real terms benefit cut will come down hard on working families and push up child poverty

    September 29, 2014
    press release

    Commenting today on Chancellor George Osborne's announcement of a proposed two-year freeze on working-age benefits, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “This is bad news for working parents struggling on low wages, already coping with rising living costs and previous benefit cuts. A couple both working full time on the minimum wage are nearly a fifth short of the money they need for basics; another freeze will make it a whole lot harder for them.1 For many of these families a higher income tax threshold will be of little help since what they gain in wages is largely clawed back from their benefits*. Two thirds of poor children have at least one parent working.

    Read more
  • Recession never went away for many families

    May 8, 2012
    press release

    Commenting on today’s announcement by ONS of the first quarter economic data, the Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, Alison Garnham, said:

    “The economy may now be back in a technical recession but the truth is that for many families with children the recession had never gone away as they have endured a miserable few years coping with rising living costs, job losses, wage freezes and cuts in social protection.

    Read more
  • Redefining Child Poverty Doesn't Tackle the Issue - The Government Must Show That All Kids Count


    Share

    After some time on the back-foot, if not in headlong retreat, common sense won out last night in the latest stage of the Welfare Reform and Work Bill's passage through parliament.

  • Report shows families want child benefit protected

    April 27, 2012
    press release

    Child Poverty Action Group has today released a report called ‘Save Child Benefit’ linked to its Save Child benefit campaign, which gives the results of a survey showing what parents spend their child benefit on and how much they value it.

    The top three main areas that parents of all social classes spend child benefit on are:

    1. Clothes and shoes (51%)

    2. Food (26%)

    3. Education related (16%)

    Read more
  • Response to Autumn Statement

    December 3, 2014
    press release

    Responding to today’s Autumn Statement, Alison Garnham Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

     

    “It’s striking that the only giveaway for children was for families who can afford to fly them abroad on holiday. For millions more children, today’s Autumn Statement is about staying the course for poverty rather than prosperity.

     

    Read more
  • Rethinking Child Poverty - our response

    29 May 2012
    news

    Today we had a taste of the debate we’re going to hear more about in the coming weeks – whether the Coalition government should move the goalposts when it comes to measuring child poverty.

    Read more
  • Rights (and wrongs) of sanctions

    At Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG), we’ve had longstanding concerns about the use of sanctions, which are basically cuts to benefit payments of up to 100% for up to 3 years, and the obvious knock-on impacts on child poverty.  And as the letter in today's Times that we and others have signed shows, we’re not alone in having profound concerns with how sanctions are working.

    Until now, there’s been little authoritative evidence of how sanctions are being applied, rightly or wrongly, beyond data suggesting a huge increase in their application in recent years.