child poverty

  • Redefining Child Poverty Doesn't Tackle the Issue - The Government Must Show That All Kids Count


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    After some time on the back-foot, if not in headlong retreat, common sense won out last night in the latest stage of the Welfare Reform and Work Bill's passage through parliament.

  • Report shows families want child benefit protected

    April 27, 2012
    press release

    Child Poverty Action Group has today released a report called ‘Save Child Benefit’ linked to its Save Child benefit campaign, which gives the results of a survey showing what parents spend their child benefit on and how much they value it.

    The top three main areas that parents of all social classes spend child benefit on are:

    1. Clothes and shoes (51%)

    2. Food (26%)

    3. Education related (16%)

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  • Response to Autumn Statement

    December 3, 2014
    press release

    Responding to today’s Autumn Statement, Alison Garnham Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

     

    “It’s striking that the only giveaway for children was for families who can afford to fly them abroad on holiday. For millions more children, today’s Autumn Statement is about staying the course for poverty rather than prosperity.

     

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  • Rethinking Child Poverty - our response

    29 May 2012
    news

    Today we had a taste of the debate we’re going to hear more about in the coming weeks – whether the Coalition government should move the goalposts when it comes to measuring child poverty.

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  • Rights (and wrongs) of sanctions

    24 July 2014
    news

    At Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG), we’ve had longstanding concerns about the use of sanctions, which are basically cuts to benefit payments of up to 100% for up to 3 years, and the obvious knock-on impacts on child poverty.  And as the letter in today's Times that we and others have signed shows, we’re not alone in having profound concerns with how sanctions are working.

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  • Rights (and wrongs) of sanctions

    At Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG), we’ve had longstanding concerns about the use of sanctions, which are basically cuts to benefit payments of up to 100% for up to 3 years, and the obvious knock-on impacts on child poverty.  And as the letter in today's Times that we and others have signed shows, we’re not alone in having profound concerns with how sanctions are working.

    Until now, there’s been little authoritative evidence of how sanctions are being applied, rightly or wrongly, beyond data suggesting a huge increase in their application in recent years.

  • Scotland map of child poverty

    4 March 2013
    news

    Glasgow City Council have mapped the recent figures published by the Campaign to End Child Poverty on the number of children living in poverty across Scotland.

    The map shows the level of child poverty by ward in Scotland. If you click on an area you can see the estimated percentage and number of children in poverty by ward in 2012.

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  • Slight fall in Scottish child poverty welcome but urgent action now needed if 2020 targets to be met

    May 12, 2011
    press release

    The Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) in Scotland has welcomed a slight fall in child poverty in Scotland but called for urgent action at Holyrood and Westminster to ensure targets to eradicate child poverty are met.

    John Dickie, head of CPAG in Scotland said;

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  • Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission publishes first annual progress report

    17 October 2013
    news

    The Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission has released its first annual report on the government's progress reducing child poverty and increasing social mobility. The report says the Coalition's child poverty strategy is failing.

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  • Social mobility and child poverty review: Call for evidence from End Child Poverty partners

    October 2011
    briefing

    This briefing was produced for CPAG's partners in the End Child Poverty (ECP) campaign, to help them provide evidence to the Independent Reviewer of Social Mobility and Child Poverty. It provides key points that partners may wish to raise in order to ensure that critical aspects of the child poverty agenda are covered.