child poverty

  • Supreme Court to decide on ‘unlawful’ bedroom tax


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    Following last month’s victory in the Court of Appeal, the battle continues for Paul and Sue Rutherford and their severely disabled grandson, Warren. The Court held that the ‘bedroom tax’ (or under-occupancy penalty) is in breach of the Human Rights Act 1998, unlawfully discriminating against disabled children requiring overnight care and victims of domestic violence living in Sanctuary Scheme Homes (in the case of ‘A’). The Government was quick to appeal this decision. We have been representing the Rutherford family since 2013 and will be in the Supreme Court defending the Court of Appeal’s decision from 29 February. SSWP v Rutherfords has been joined with other bedroom tax cases, MA & Others and A.

  • Tax credits calamity hammers 200,000 families and harms the economy

    May 8, 2012
    press release

    New figures today, published by HMRC, show that over 200,000 families will be losing their entire working tax credit support, worth £3,870, from 6 April 2012. The Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, Alison Garnham, said:

    “This is an absolute calamity that plunges nearly half a million children deep below the poverty line. Many of these parents will now have less money in work than if they just claimed benefits. It runs directly against the consensus on the importance of making work pay and the government’s duties on child poverty.

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  • The child poverty strategy: what worked?

    Issue 136 (Summer 2010)
    article

    Over the past decade, the UK has embarked on an ambitious effort to end child poverty. Jane Waldfogel has tracked the progress of the initiative and reports on it in her new book, Britain’s War on Poverty . Here, she provides some highlights of her study and suggests some next steps.

  • The Costs of Going to School

    April 22, 2014
    press release

    Child Poverty Action Group, the National Union of Teachers, the British Youth Council and Kids Company have jointly released a report on the Costs of Going to School produced by a group of 400 school-aged young people.

    For the full press release, visit the NUT website.

    The report can be downloaded from the top right of this page.

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  • The independence referendum: what does it mean for child poverty?

    15 September 2014
    news

    With just a few days to go before the referendum John Dickie, Director of CPAG in Scotland, has written a blog highlighting how CPAG has informed the terms of debate and argues that the challenge now for anti-poverty campaigners is to ensure that heightened public engagement and concern with child poverty in campaign debates is harnessed for real change, wherever powers end up lying after September 18th.

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  • Tribunal ruling on DLA entitlement for disabled refugee children


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    CPAG welcomes the Upper Tribunal decision on disabled refugee children who up to now, have not been entitled to disability living allowance (DLA) until they have spent over two years in the UK. On 17 March 2016, Judge Kate Markus QC found that the current past presence test unjustifiably discriminates against refugees and their family members and should therefore be dis-applied.

  • Trying to get by: children and young people talk about poverty

    Issue 139 (Summer 2011)
    article

    What does poverty mean for the children and young people themselves? Why are their voices missing from the current debate? In this article, Kerry Martin and Ruth Hart discuss the findings from a qualitative research project that reports on what children and young people have to say about the impact that poverty has on their lives.

  • Two thirds of children in poverty living in working families

    June 13, 2013
    press release

    New figures today show that children below the poverty line are now twice as likely to come from homes with work, than homes without work.

    Responding to today’s official figures on UK child poverty for 2011/12, published today by DWP, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “Despite all the talk about ‘scroungers’ and generations of families never working, today’s poverty figures expose comprehensively the myth that the main cause of poverty is people choosing not to work. The truth is that for a growing number of families work isn’t working. The promise that work would be a route out of poverty has not been kept as wages stagnate and spending cuts have hurt low income working families.

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  • Why March really was miserable for child poverty

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    It’s been an awful month for UK child poverty but Iain Duncan Smith’s Centre for Social Justice (CSJ) has published some rather questionable claims made about the way we measure and use child poverty statistics.

  • Why this week's child poverty figures help explain last's budget

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    For a Prime Minister who walked into Downing Street decrying the ‘burning injustice’ of poverty and contrasting the opportunities available to some children but not others, there was a disappointing omission in last week’s budget: child poverty.