conditionality

  • The Welfare Reform and Work Bill and human rights

    Issue 250 (February 2016)
    article

    The Welfare Reform and Work Bill, if passed into law, will have a significant impact on claimants (for an overview, see Bulletin 247). Mike Spencer and Sophie Earnshaw consider whether its more controversial measures would comply with human rights law.

  • Responding to increasing conditionality and sanctions


    page

    Alongside the reductions to payment, the welfare reform programme is introducing more conditionality which brings with it a higher risk of sanctions. Sanctions are a particular concern for local authorities, as the social fund hardship scheme has been localised, and councils may have to meet the needs of households experiencing hardship as a result of benefit sanctions.

  • Conditionality and sanctions

    Level: Standard

    training course

    This course will give an understanding of the current conditionality regime for claimant of JSA and ESA. Tougher sanctions rules and the work programme have transformed the conditionality regime for many claimants.

    This course covers:

    Read more
  • Government press on with compulsion

    Issue 201 (February 2008)
    article

    A trio of official publications in late 2007 and early this year provide further detail of the increasing compulsion - or conditionality - being applied to benefit claimants, with the accompanying threat of sanctions (and resulting poverty) for non-compliance. Simon Osborne describes the announcements.

  • Rights (and wrongs) of sanctions

    At Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG), we’ve had longstanding concerns about the use of sanctions, which are basically cuts to benefit payments of up to 100% for up to 3 years, and the obvious knock-on impacts on child poverty.  And as the letter in today's Times that we and others have signed shows, we’re not alone in having profound concerns with how sanctions are working.

    Until now, there’s been little authoritative evidence of how sanctions are being applied, rightly or wrongly, beyond data suggesting a huge increase in their application in recent years.

  • Rights (and wrongs) of sanctions

    24 July 2014
    news

    At Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG), we’ve had longstanding concerns about the use of sanctions, which are basically cuts to benefit payments of up to 100% for up to 3 years, and the obvious knock-on impacts on child poverty.  And as the letter in today's Times that we and others have signed shows, we’re not alone in having profound concerns with how sanctions are working.

    Read more