employment

  • Hard Work: parental employment in London

    September 2015
    briefing

    Hard Work looks at what is happening with parental employment in London. It finds that mothers in couples in London are significantly less likely to be working than their counterparts elsewhere. While employment rates amongst lone parents has risen significantly over recent years and looks set to catch up to the national rate, the gap between the UK and London for mothers in couples shows no sign of decreasing.

  • Missing potential: why the European funds should be used to support parental employment in London

    June 2013
    briefing

    London has the highest child poverty rates in the country, and the lowest rates of mothers employment. This briefing argues that the next round of the European Social Fund from 2014 should be used in London to support parents to access paid work.

  • Response to GLA Economy Committee on Adult careers services

    February 2013
    briefing

    The Greater London Authority's Economy Committee is consulting on adult careers services. This response sets out why CPAG believes that these should focus on parents.

  • We can work it out: parental employment in London

    November 2012
    briefing

    Child poverty in London is mostly explained by the low rates of parents in paid employment. In London, 17.2 per cent of children live in workless households, compared with 15.1 per cent in the UK as a whole; over half of lone parents in London are out of work, compared with 38 per cent in the UK. But this report shows that low parental employment rates in London are not an intractable problem. Many more parents in London have moved into work in recent years, and many more could do so if this were made a priority for local, regional and central government.

  • Budget 2014: Child Poverty Action Group on the impact on families

    March 19, 2014
    press release

    Responding to the Chancellor’s Budget Statement today Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “Today’s Budget tries to lock-in austerity for millions of low-paid families, poor children, carers and disabled people. Announcing a cap for social security spending without a plan to address the root causes of low pay, high rents and high childcare costs, simply forces the most vulnerable in society to pay the price for inaction.

    Read more
  • Employment and migrant poverty

    Issue 138 (Spring 2011)
    article

    The issue of migrant poverty and employment is complex and migrants’ experiences in the UK differ enormously. While some of these variations stem from the uniqueness of individual experience, others relate to the migrant’s particular immigration status and her/his associated right to reside in the UK and to access work.

  • Hard Work: parental employment in London

    1 September 2015
    news

    Our new report looks at parental employment rates in London, and what can be done to make working a better option for parents in the capital. Read more.

    Read more
  • How can London mothers escape the poverty trap?


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    Why are mothers in London less likely to work than their counterparts across the country, and how can we ensure that having more parents in jobs brings the capital’s high child poverty rates down?

  • Rights (and wrongs) of sanctions

    At Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG), we’ve had longstanding concerns about the use of sanctions, which are basically cuts to benefit payments of up to 100% for up to 3 years, and the obvious knock-on impacts on child poverty.  And as the letter in today's Times that we and others have signed shows, we’re not alone in having profound concerns with how sanctions are working.

    Until now, there’s been little authoritative evidence of how sanctions are being applied, rightly or wrongly, beyond data suggesting a huge increase in their application in recent years.