inequality

  • Supreme Court to decide on ‘unlawful’ bedroom tax


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    Following last month’s victory in the Court of Appeal, the battle continues for Paul and Sue Rutherford and their severely disabled grandson, Warren. The Court held that the ‘bedroom tax’ (or under-occupancy penalty) is in breach of the Human Rights Act 1998, unlawfully discriminating against disabled children requiring overnight care and victims of domestic violence living in Sanctuary Scheme Homes (in the case of ‘A’). The Government was quick to appeal this decision. We have been representing the Rutherford family since 2013 and will be in the Supreme Court defending the Court of Appeal’s decision from 29 February. SSWP v Rutherfords has been joined with other bedroom tax cases, MA & Others and A.

  • Tackling the ‘two New Yorks’: what can London learn?

    As Londoners start to consider who their next mayor could be, does the New York race give clues for the London campaign?

  • The parent trap: promoting poor children’s mental health

    Issue 137 (Autumn 2010)
    article

    The physical health of children today is arguably the best it has been since the Second World War, with their environments and nutrition substantially improved. However, while their physical health has improved through measures such as immunisation and better access to healthcare, mental health problems among children have increased.

  • Unjust rewards

    Issue 131 (Autumn 2008)
    article

    After months of persuasion and with great difficulty, Polly Toynbee and David Walker managed to assemble focus groups of some of the country’s highest earners. Most of these City merchant bankers and lawyers were in the top 0.1 per cent, earning around £500,000, some up to £10 million, a year. Ipsos Mori had never before managed to assemble such high earners. Here, Polly Toynbee describes the key findings from these focus groups, now published in Unjust Rewards. What did they know and think about Britain’s growing inequality, and the widening gap between themselves and everyone else? Were they uneasy? Did they worry about their children being brought up so isolated from the rest?

  • What should be done next?

    Issue 136 (Summer 2010)
    article

    Child poverty is not a discrete social problem that can be eradicated without tackling wider inequalities of income and wealth. As the recent National Equality Panel report demonstrates, earnings, income and wealth are all distributed highly unequally, thereby undermining the goal of ‘equality of opportunity’ for children espoused by the main political parties. Social class interacts with other social divisions such as gender, ethnicity and disability to shape the contours of poverty and inequality. Ruth Lister argues that a multi-pronged (gendered) strategy is required, which explicitly aims to create a more equal society within which all children can flourish.