living standards

  • The cost of a child in 2014

    August 2014
    briefing

    Today we publish our third annual report ‘The Cost of a Child in 2014’, written by Donald Hirsch from the Centre for Research in Social Policy at Loughborough University and funded by JRF. It draws on the Minimum Income Standard project (MIS) to establish how much families need to cover their basic needs like food, clothes and shelter, and to participate in society.

  • Editorial: Poverty cannot be reduced to a one-dimensional caricature

    Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
    article

    As the consultation on the government’s latest three-year child poverty consultation closes, it seeks to articulate the policies it sees as reducing poverty, even as it prevaricates over how to define it. This issue of Poverty explores questions that are surely important to anyone seeking to reduce poverty, and to understand it. What does poverty look like? How does it feel?

  • Coping with a lack of data and data sharing


    page

    Many authorities mentioned a lack of information and data as potentially hampering their ability to tackle poverty in their area. Data was often described as difficult to gather, or having a considerable time-lag which, given the fast pace of the reform programme, made responding difficult.

  • Autumn Statement creates new rationing system for children, working families and disabled people

    December 5, 2013
    press release

    Responding to today’s Autumn Statement, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “Today’s Autumn Statement creates a new income rationing system for children, working families and disabled people through a national cap on their basic support.

    Read more
  • Budget 2014: Child Poverty Action Group on the impact on families

    March 19, 2014
    press release

    Responding to the Chancellor’s Budget Statement today Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “Today’s Budget tries to lock-in austerity for millions of low-paid families, poor children, carers and disabled people. Announcing a cap for social security spending without a plan to address the root causes of low pay, high rents and high childcare costs, simply forces the most vulnerable in society to pay the price for inaction.

    Read more
  • Fair for who? Child maintenance and family tests.

    Prime Minister David Cameron has announced that he wants to see all domestic government policies subjected to a ‘family test’ in future, apparently to ensure that families aren’t undermined or made worse off financially.  But does the ‘family test’ itself pass the test?

    Initially at least, it may be difficult to understand why anyone would be against such an approach. Indeed, we have been arguing that government should pay attention to a wide range of policy areas, such as employment, benefits, and family support services, to reduce child poverty and help improve the lot of poor families for many years.

    One concern, however, is that it’s unclear whether the proposed ‘family test’ applies to lone parent families, too.

  • Miliband proposal on minimum wage would lock fairness into the growing economy

    May 19, 2014
    press release

    Responding to the Labour leader Ed Miliband’s announcement today on the minimum wage, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “The inconvenient truth is that for too many families, work isn't a route out of poverty – two-thirds of poor children live in working families.

    “Tackling the UK's low pay problem will reduce the burden on tax credits and housing benefits, freeing up resources to target back to those who need most help.

    “As the economy grows it is only right that everyone shares the benefits including the lowest paid and this would lock fairness into the growing economy.”

    Read more
  • Response to announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate

    October 31, 2016
    press release

    Responding today to the announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said:

    “A London Living Wage rate for 2016-17 of £9.75 is a beacon of good news on a pretty grim horizon for the capital's families. 4 in 10 London children live in poverty, over half of these children live in a family where someone is in work so the London Living Wage provides an important mechanism to reduce in-work poverty in London.

    Read more
  • Zero-hour contracts are wrong type of growth

    April 30, 2014
    press release

    Commenting on new analysis published today by the Office for National Statistics showing the number of zero-hour contract jobs is higher than previously thought, Imran Hussain, Head of Policy, Rights and Advocacy for Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “It’s not enough to look at how much the economy is growing, we need to look at how the economy is changing too. We need a recovery all can share in and which isn’t built on the backs of more working families stuck in low pay or the insecurity of zero-hour contracts.

    Read more