London

  • Welfare reform – early impacts

    Issue 231 (December 2012)
    article

    Kate Bell looks gives an overview of what early research has uncovered about the future impact of welfare reform.

  • We can work it out: parental employment in London

    November 2012
    briefing

    Child poverty in London is mostly explained by the low rates of parents in paid employment. In London, 17.2 per cent of children live in workless households, compared with 15.1 per cent in the UK as a whole; over half of lone parents in London are out of work, compared with 38 per cent in the UK. But this report shows that low parental employment rates in London are not an intractable problem. Many more parents in London have moved into work in recent years, and many more could do so if this were made a priority for local, regional and central government.

  • Between a rock and a hard place: early impacts of welfare reform on London

    November 2012
    briefing

    This report from our London project examines the early impact of welfare reforms across London. It finds that the reforms will create problems for local authorities and families with children, and makes recommendations to national, regional and local government, and to advice agencies, on how best to mitigate these.

  • Food poverty in London

    October 2012
    briefing

    CPAG submitted evidence to the London Assembly’s inquiry into food poverty.

  • The implementation of the Child Poverty Act: examining child poverty strategies in London local authorities

    October 2012
    briefing

    This report from CPAG and 4in10 at Save the Children examines progress and best practice in implementing child poverty strategies across local authorities in London.

  • Delivering the social fund at London-level: opportunities and risks

    June 2012
    briefing

    This report focuses on delivery of the social fund by local authorities in London. Four in ten children in the capital live in poverty, the highest rate of any region, and support for families on low incomes is therefore particularly important here. The report presents an account of the existing social fund scheme that is being devolved to local authorities, examines some current options for delivery and looks at promising approaches and key risks.

    The aim of the report is to provide a useful resource for local authorities considering how to use the money that will be devolved to them to replace current provision of community care grants and crisis loans through the social fund. The report also has some important messages for central government.

  • A new poll tax?

    If I lost my job tomorrow, one of the things that I would expect would be that while I was not earning, I would not be paying tax. However, in 26 out of 33 London boroughs this is not the case: I would still need to pay council tax.

  • A new poll tax? London's poorest and councils hit hard by Council Tax changes

    July 17, 2014
    press release

    London’s poorest families are struggling to pay council tax bills from their limited benefit income following cuts to council tax support, according to new figures published in a joint report by two leading London anti-poverty charities, the Child Poverty Action Group and Z2K.

    ‘A New Poll Tax?’ finds that nearly 4 in 10 Londoners affected by the replacement of Council Tax Benefit by local schemes have been unable to meet these payments and have received a court summons.

    Read more
  • An overview of welfare reform in London


    page

    This presentation on the impact of benefit cuts in London was given to the London Borough of Lambeth’s welfare reform conference in September 2012.

    It's available to download as a PDF (see right).

  • Child poverty in London


    page

    700,000 children living in London are below the poverty line, 37 per cent of all children in the capital. While poverty rates are higher for everyone in London than nationally, this gap is larger for children than for any other group. London has the highest rate of child poverty of any English region, and there are as many poor children in London as in all of Scotland and Wales.