poverty

  • Two child limit challenge

    Last updated: October 17, 2017
    test case

    Update - 17 October 2017 - permission has been granted for CPAG to apply for judicial review of the two child limit and the case will now go forward to a full hearing.

    On 18 August 2017 CPAG issued a claim for judicial review in the High Court against the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (SSWP) to challenge the two child limit, introduced by the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016.

    On 6 April 2017, new rules came into force limiting the child element of child tax credit (CTC) and universal credit (UC) awards to two children. In CTC, this limit only applies to a third or subsequent child born on or after 6 April 2017; in UC the limit applies from 6 April 2017 (irrespective of when the child was born) though transitional protection applies to third or subsequent children born before 6 April 2017. There are a limited number of exceptions to this 2 child limit meaning that it does not apply to a third or subsequent child in the following circumstances: multiple births, adoption from local authority care, kinship care and children likely to have been conceived as a result of rape or a coercive or controlling relationship.

  • Refusal to accept late mandatory reconsideration requests

    Last updated: September 25, 2017
    test case

    Update - 25 September 2017 - on 4 August 2017 a three-judge panel of the Upper Tribunal decided that, where a claimant makes a mandatory reconsideration request at any time within 13 months of the original decision, s/he will, if dissatisfied, subsequently be entitled to appeal to a First-tier Tribunal.

  • Moving to The London Living Wage: A Guide for Local Authorities in London


    page

    This is a practical, comprehensive guide from CPAG and the Living Wage Foundation, which aims to help local authorities in London become accredited Living Wage employers.

    The guide explains:

  • Abolishing hunger among children in the UK

    Issue 153 (Winter 2016)
    article

    We will all have woken up this morning knowing there are children in this country who went to bed last night on an empty stomach. We also know that a large number of those children will have taken that hunger with them to school. This is the most crushing finding from a recent report from the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Hunger, examining the extent, causes and changing dynamics of hunger among families in the UK. With the reliance on food banks on the increase, the Group’s Chair, Frank Field, and the report’s author, Andrew Forsey, summarise the evidence received and present some potential solutions.

  • Adding to the shame of poverty: the public, politicians and the media

    Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
    article

    The denigration of people in poverty is not new. It has been evident since at least the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry VIII when the Tudor state assumed de facto responsibility for the care of ‘paupers’, and the terms ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ were coined. The words used have changed and the vehemence of the language has ebbed and flowed, but the divisive, self-justifying distinction between the workless, rogues, idlers and scroungers on the one hand and the hardworking, law-abiding, responsible, ‘middle class’, taxpayer has not. Robert Walker and Elaine Chase draw on their recent research to highlight how recent welfare reforms continue our long tradition of shaming people who live in poverty.

  • Editorial: Poverty cannot be reduced to a one-dimensional caricature

    Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
    article

    As the consultation on the government’s latest three-year child poverty consultation closes, it seeks to articulate the policies it sees as reducing poverty, even as it prevaricates over how to define it. This issue of Poverty explores questions that are surely important to anyone seeking to reduce poverty, and to understand it. What does poverty look like? How does it feel?

  • The poor of the mass media

    Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
    article

    Stories and pictures in the mass media form an important basis for creating opinions of ‘the poor’ and welfare recipients. The media content influences who we think these people are, how we think they behave and what we think should be done to either help or punish them. In The Rise and Fall of Social Cohesion, Christian Albrekt Larsen illustrates how the US and UK are caught in a vicious circle. High levels of poverty and a targeted welfare system produce a large volume of newsworthy negative stories, which make further punishment the most likely political response. Who would want to help scroungers and spongers? In contrast, Sweden and Denmark are caught in a virtuous circle. Low levels of poverty and a universal welfare system reduce the amount of newsworthy negative stories and allow room for stories about the deserving poor. Who does not want to help our ordinary fellow citizens in need? Here, he describes his research.

  • Dealing with destitution

    Level: Standard

    training course

    Advisers are often faced with clients who have been left destitute due to a problem with their benefits. This course will cover issues that frequently cause clients to be left without any income and focus on the practical steps advisers can take to get their clients benefits in payment as quickly as possible.

    The course covers:

    Read more
    Dates:
  • Poverty in Scotland updated summary August 2013

    August 2013
    briefing

    We have updated our summary briefing on poverty in Scotland which you can view here.

  • Poverty in Scotland updated summary briefing August 2013

    August 2013
    briefing

    We have updated our summary briefing on poverty in Scotland which gives the latest key facts on the extent, trends, causes and impact of poverty which you can view here.