Scottish Government

  • New social security powers in Scotland

    Issue 251 (April 2016)
    article

    Judith Paterson looks at proposals to use new social security powers in Scotland.

  • Programme for Scottish Government 2016-2021


    page

    The next Scottish Government will be confronted with an imminent rise in child poverty, with a projected 50% increase by 2020 largely driven by UK tax and benefit policies.

    With this in mind CPAG’s programme for government sets out a range of measures aimed at prioritising the eradication of child poverty in Scotland and minimising its damaging effects on children, families, services and the country’s economy.

  • Initial thoughts on devolution

    October 2014
    briefing

    Further devolution in Scotland should be underpinned by clear strategic objectives and principles. The merits of any settlement should be judged on the extent to which they provide a realistic opportunity to reduce child poverty and wider socio-economic inequality.

  • Response to the Local Government and Regeneration Committee Call for Evidence on 14/15 Draft Budget

    October 2013
    briefing

    The 14/15 Budget comes at a critical time for child poverty in Scotland. One in five (200,000) of Scotland’s children are officially recognised as living in poverty, a level significantly higher than in other European countries. Independent modelling by the Institute for Fiscal studies (IFS) also forecasts massive increases in child poverty with an estimated 65,000 more children living in poverty in Scotland by 2020, primarily as a result of current UK government tax and benefit policy.

  • Letter to the Minister for Health and Wellbeing and DWP Minister about the social fund in Scotland 23.04.12

    April 2012
    briefing

    CPAG in Scotland has been actively lobbying the Scottish Government and Parliament on the importance of setting up an adequate replacement to the discretionary social fund (community care grants and crisis loans) following their abolition from April 2013 under the UK Welfare Reform Act.

  • Briefing for the Scottish Government Debate on the Poverty Framework


    briefing

    Briefing for the Scottish Government Debate on the Poverty Framework in which CPAG highlights three areas of urgent action needed to ensure the Framework delivers for families facing poverty across Scotland. Key CPAG Calls:

    1. Clear mechanisms for driving progress and monitoring how the Framework is being implemented at local level

    2. Full delivery on free school meal and school clothing grant commitments

    3. Commitment to proof spending decisions for impact on child poverty.

  • Child poverty campaigners respond to Expert Working Group on Welfare

    June 4, 2014
    press release
    • Report creates ‘opportunity for a far more positive approach to social security for families in and out of work wherever powers lie’
    • However, new approach must go further and “be underpinned by a restoration of the value and universality of child benefit”
    • “No excuse for continuing to tolerate a social security system that leaves children languishing in poverty”

    The Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) in Scotland today responded to the publication of the Scottish Government’s Expert Working Group report on Welfare.

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  • Child poverty campaigners respond to Expert Working Group on Welfare

    4 June 2014
    news

    Read our response to the publication of the second report by the Scottish Government’s Expert Working Group on Welfare: Re-thinking welfare: fair, personal and simple.

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  • Child Poverty Strategy Consultation: CPAG's response


    briefing

    CPAG response in December 2010 to the Child Poverty Strategy Consultation.

  • CPAG in Scotland Briefing on proposed amendments to the Scotland Bill 2015 Committee Stage

    26 June 2015
    news

    CPAG in Scotland briefing on proposed amendments to the Scotland Bill 2015 Committee Stage Part 3 Clauses 19-30, which sets out our concerns relating to the 'welfare' clauses of the Scotland Bill 2015.

    These include:

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