universal credit

  • Welfare reform in 2013

    Issue 233 (April 2013)
    article

    2013 is a landmark year in welfare reform. Simon Osborne outlines the main changes.

  • Introduction to benefits for ill-health


    training course

     

    This one-day course gives you an introduction to employment and support allowance (ESA) and to claiming amounts in universal credit (UC) for ill or disabled people who are unable to work. Assuming little or no previous experience, this course provides an introduction to the medical assessments that apply for both ESA and universal credit.

    The course covers:

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  • Universal credit - the essentials

    Level: Basic

    training course

    The introduction of universal credit (UC) represents a fundamental change to the system of 'legacy benefits' and tax credits it is replacing.

    This one day introductory course provides an overview of UC, covering:

    • the aims and principles of UC;
    • the roll-out of UC in 'gateway' and 'full service' areas;
    • who can claim UC;
    • how it is calculated and paid;
    • conditionality and sanctions

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  • Editorial: low-income families face another bleak year

    Issue 141 (Spring 2013)
    article

    Looking back at how low-income families fared in 2012 is a dispiriting exercise: minimal wage rises, the escalating price of essentials and benefit cuts all conspired to make it a dismal year.  Sadly, 2013 looks set to be no better: this year we will see, among other things, the introduction of the benefit cap which, for the first time since the 1970s, disconnects assistance from assessed need; the localisation of the social fund and of council tax benefit, which will result in many low-income families having to find the funds to pay council tax in the future; and the advent of the tougher regimes of both universal credit and personal independence payment.

  • Payments for supported accommodation under universal credit

    Issue 231 (December 2012)
    article

    David Simmons considers how payments for supported accommodation will be met after the introduction of universal credit, in the light of recent government announcements.

  • Universal credit: monthly awards

    Issue 230 (October 2012)
    article

    David Simmons examines the proposal to make universal credit a monthly benefit.

  • Universal credit – an update

    Issue 229 (August 2012)
    article

    Simon Osborne describes recent developments concerning the introduction, main rules and claims and payments arrangements of universal credit.

  • Universal credit and related regulations: response to the SSAC’s call for evidence

    July 2012
    briefing

    This is CPAG’ s response to the Social Security Advisory Committee's call for evidence on the draft universal credit and related regulations.

    The submission highlights our concerns that in many instances simplification is a mask for cuts, as complex but important features of the current system are replaced with less generous provision.

  • Housing benefit - the problem areas

    Level: Standard

    training course

    Housing benefit is there to help with rent and avoid eviction, including for the growing number of people in low-paid work. Yet over four billion pounds of housing benefit goes unclaimed by over one million households. With the roll out of universal credit not due to complete until 2022, housing benefit remains as important as ever.

    This one-day course looks in detail at a number of common areas of dispute that housing benefit claimants may face and how they can be resolved to ensure maximum entitlement is received.

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    Dates:
  • Universal credit: what we know and don’t yet know

    Issue 227 (April 2012)
    article

    David Simmons considers what we do and don’t know about universal credit, following the passing of the Welfare Reform Act 2012.