universal credit

  • Universal credit: what we know and don’t yet know

    Issue 227 (April 2012)
    article

    David Simmons considers what we do and don’t know about universal credit, following the passing of the Welfare Reform Act 2012.

  • Welfare Reform Act 2012

    Issue 227 (April 2012)
    article

    Do acts speak louder than words? Edward Graham gives a round-up of the changes on their way.

  • Universal credit: the basic facts and how it will operate


    factsheet

    Universal credit is a new benefit that will be introduced in October 2013, replacing current means-tested benefits and tax credits for working-age people. This factsheet outlines what is currently known about universal credit and how it will work.

     

  • Escalating conditionality

    Issue 225 (December 2011)
    article

    David Simmons describes the new conditionality regime for benefit claimants provided for in the Welfare Reform Bill 2011.

  • Spending Review – more cuts

    Issue 219 (December 2010)
    article

    Angela Toal examines the changes to welfare benefits and tax credits announced in the Government’s Spending Review in October 2010.

  • Twenty-first century welfare

    Issue 218 (October 2010)
    article

    David Simmons examines the Government’s consultation paper on reforming the current system of benefits and tax credits.

  • THE AUSTERITY GENERATION: PROMISE OF GREATER REWARDS FROM WORK BROKEN UNDER UNIVERSAL CREDIT AS FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN HARDEST HIT BY CUTS

    November 6, 2017
    press release

    The promise of greater rewards from work made to working families has been broken as a result of cuts to Universal Credit and tax credits, with losses reaching thousands of pounds in many cases, new analysis by Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) and the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) shows.
     
    ‘The Austerity Generation’ reveals that the cuts to Universal Credit (UC) will put 1 million more children into poverty – which means the long term impact of austerity policies will be felt for many years to come by the UK economy and society more generally. The report also finds that families already at greater risk of poverty – including lone parents, families with very young children, larger families and those with a disability – will be especially hard-hit by a decade of cuts to the incomes of families with children.
     

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  • Can universal credit be made to work to reduce poverty?

     

    This blog was originally published by Richard Exell and Lindsay Judge on Touchstone.

    Universal credit (UC) may be much-maligned but like it or not, it’s coming our way. Given this, how can it best deliver on its dual promise to make work pay and reduce poverty? The TUC and Child Poverty Action Group have been exploring this question in recent months, ably assisted by Howard Reed of Landman Economics. Here, we offer a sneak preview of our results.

  • Childcare in Universal Credit: Joint press release from CPAG and other organisations

    October 17, 2013
    press release

    Government risks throwing away chance to tackle in-work poverty for the poorest parents, charities warn today

    Joint press release from: Barnardo’s, the Children’s Society, the Trades Union Congress, Child Poverty Action Group, Gingerbread, Working Families, The Resolution Foundation, The Women’s Budget Group

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  • CPAG responds to the Autumn Statement

    5 December 2013
    news

    We have criticised the Chancellor's Autumn Statement for rationing support for children, working families and disabled people through a national cap on social security.

    See our full reaction in the CPAG press statement.

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