uprating

  • The impact of the Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill

    Issue 144 (Spring 2013)
    article

    In December 2012, at the tail end of the parliamentary session, the government laid before the House of Commons a new piece of legislation. The Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill 2012 has a clear objective: to legitimate the Chancellor’s decision in his Autumn Statement to uprate key in- and out-of-work benefits by just 1 per cent for the next three fiscal years. Lindsay Judge explores the likely impacts of the Bill on the fortunes of children growing up in low-income families in the UK today, and subjects some of the rhetorical claims surrounding it to further scrutiny.

  • The Double Lockout: How low income families will be locked out of fair living standards

    January 2013
    briefing

    This report, published on the eve of the second reading of the Welfare Benefits Up-Rating Bill 2012-13, reveals that the government’s welfare benefit uprating legislation is based on bogus claims and is a poverty-producing bill that will further exclude the poorest workers, jobseekers, carers and disabled people from the mainstream of society.

  • Autumn Statement: No short-changing of strivers or making poor pay for missed growth

    5 December 2012
    news

    Today's Autumn Statement by the Chancellor is expected to contain a number of announcements affecting low income families.

    CPAG is caling on the Chancellor not to short-change 'strivers' or to make the poor pay for missed growth. You can read our media statement here.

    Read more
  • Autumn Statement: New cuts hit children in working and out of work families

    December 5, 2012
    press release

    Commenting in response to the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty action Group, said:

    “Despite all the talk, working families are once again at the front of the queue for spending cuts. With 6 in 10 poor children living with a working parent, real terms cuts to tax credits, housing and child benefits are grim news.

    “Today’s measures give a net income boost to 3 out of 5 people in the wealthiest half of the population, whilst everyone in the poorest half will see their income cut. If we are all in it together, some of us – the poorest – are in it deeper than the rest.

    Read more
  • First thoughts on the ‘National Living Wage’


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    A substantial increase in the National Minimum Wage for over-25s (or National Living Wage, as Osborne’s re-badging has it) can only be a good thing for low-paid workers. It should be celebrated. That much, at least, is clear.

  • Real terms benefit cut will come down hard on working families and push up child poverty

    September 29, 2014
    press release

    Commenting today on Chancellor George Osborne's announcement of a proposed two-year freeze on working-age benefits, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “This is bad news for working parents struggling on low wages, already coping with rising living costs and previous benefit cuts. A couple both working full time on the minimum wage are nearly a fifth short of the money they need for basics; another freeze will make it a whole lot harder for them.1 For many of these families a higher income tax threshold will be of little help since what they gain in wages is largely clawed back from their benefits*. Two thirds of poor children have at least one parent working.

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  • Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill: Commons second reading

    8 January 2013
    news

    MPs this afternoon have been debating the Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill, at its second reading.

    The DWP's impact assessment on the bill was published immediately before the debate. CPAG's media statement highlights that this assessment omits the poverty impact of the bill.

    Read more
  • ‘Double Lockout Bill’ cuts real support for workers and jobseekers by 4%

    January 7, 2013
    press release

    A new report published today by Child Poverty Action Group, with contributions from a range of experts, reveals that the government’s welfare benefit uprating legislation is based on bogus claims and is a poverty-producing bill that will further exclude the poorest workers, jobseekers, carers and disabled people from the mainstream of society.

    Read more