welfare to work

  • Sanction busting: part 3

    Issue 237 (December 2013)
    article

    Tessa Gregory from Public Interest Solicitors considers the implications of the Supreme Court judgment in R (Reilly and Wilson) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions.

  • Missing potential: why the European funds should be used to support parental employment in London

    June 2013
    briefing

    London has the highest child poverty rates in the country, and the lowest rates of mothers employment. This briefing argues that the next round of the European Social Fund from 2014 should be used in London to support parents to access paid work.

  • Benefits and the Work Programme


    factsheet

    This factsheet gives you information on the Work Programme and the way it affects benefit claimants.

    Overview

  • Can welfare reform work?

    Issue 139 (Summer 2011)
    article

    Since the late 1990s, successive governments have engaged in the process of welfare reform. A cross-party consensus has emerged, which prioritises moving benefit recipients into work and increasing the role of private and voluntary providers in delivering employment services. Sharon Wright outlines the pros and cons of this approach.

  • Rights (and wrongs) of sanctions

    At Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG), we’ve had longstanding concerns about the use of sanctions, which are basically cuts to benefit payments of up to 100% for up to 3 years, and the obvious knock-on impacts on child poverty.  And as the letter in today's Times that we and others have signed shows, we’re not alone in having profound concerns with how sanctions are working.

    Until now, there’s been little authoritative evidence of how sanctions are being applied, rightly or wrongly, beyond data suggesting a huge increase in their application in recent years.

  • Rights (and wrongs) of sanctions

    24 July 2014
    news

    At Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG), we’ve had longstanding concerns about the use of sanctions, which are basically cuts to benefit payments of up to 100% for up to 3 years, and the obvious knock-on impacts on child poverty.  And as the letter in today's Times that we and others have signed shows, we’re not alone in having profound concerns with how sanctions are working.

    Read more