in-work poverty

  • Local figures for children and families losing Working Tax Credit in April

    March 20, 2012
    press release

    In April 2012, around half a million children will suddenly be at risk of being plunged into poverty as the Working Tax Credit hours rule changes for couples.

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  • London families need jobs they can raise a family on

    October 20, 2011
    press release

    In response to the publication of the London Poverty Profile published today by the Trust for London, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) said:

    “This valuable, in-depth report is the latest to spell out the extent and the depth of poverty facing London’s children.

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  • Looking for families affected by the benefit cap

    9 August 2016
    news

    This autumn the benefit cap will be cut, squeezing low-income families even further and pushing more people into poverty. We are looking for test cases to legally challenge the benefit cap.

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  • Low pay, no pay churning: the hidden story of work and worklessness

    Issue 142 (Summer 2012)
    article

    Rather than the popular image of feckless people languishing in long-term unemployment, recent research for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has found that the predominant experience of being out of work is one of moving in and out of low-paid, short-term jobs, and on and off benefits. This cycling, or ‘churning’, between work and no work, with people taking poor quality jobs that are often paid too little to move them away from poverty, not only runs directly counter to the dominant story about welfare dependency, but has also been largely ignored by successive governments. Tracy Shildrick outlines some of the research findings and argues that policy must now focus on the quality, as well as the number, of jobs available if work is to provide a lasting route out of poverty.

  • LOW-PAID PARENTS FIGHTING FOR WORK-HOME BALANCE

    April 30, 2015
    press release

     

     Low-paid parents can be helped to overcome the greater barriers they face in striking the right balance for their families between work and parenting through better childcare support, more responsive employers and a stronger and more effective social security system, according to a report published today by Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) commissioned by the Webb Memorial Trust.

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  • Miliband proposal on minimum wage would lock fairness into the growing economy

    May 19, 2014
    press release

    Responding to the Labour leader Ed Miliband’s announcement today on the minimum wage, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “The inconvenient truth is that for too many families, work isn't a route out of poverty – two-thirds of poor children live in working families.

    “Tackling the UK's low pay problem will reduce the burden on tax credits and housing benefits, freeing up resources to target back to those who need most help.

    “As the economy grows it is only right that everyone shares the benefits including the lowest paid and this would lock fairness into the growing economy.”

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  • New analysis highlights child poverty risks of Chancellor’s new spending cap

    March 18, 2014
    press release

    New analysis commissioned by Child Poverty Action Group from the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at Essex University highlights how the expected budget announcement on capping Annually Managed Expenditure (AME) could drive up UK child poverty rates.

    The ‘AME cap’ will set an annual ceiling on overall spending for working age support through tax credits and benefits for low paid workers, carers, disabled people and single parents.

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  • Promoting fairness? Lowering the benefit cap will push more families into poverty

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    This autumn the benefit cap will be cut, squeezing low-income families even further and pushing more people into poverty. The Welfare Reform & Work Act 2016 lowers the cap to £23,000 per annum for families (or £15,410 for single claimants) in London and £20,000 for families (or £13,400 for single claimants) outside of London. There are currently 3.9 million children living in poverty. Projections from the Institute for Fiscal Studies suggests that child poverty could rise by 50 per cent by 2020. Tightening the cap and taking away more support from low-income households will have a devastating effect on families and children.

  • Response to announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate

    October 31, 2016
    press release

    Responding today to the announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said:

    “A London Living Wage rate for 2016-17 of £9.75 is a beacon of good news on a pretty grim horizon for the capital's families. 4 in 10 London children live in poverty, over half of these children live in a family where someone is in work so the London Living Wage provides an important mechanism to reduce in-work poverty in London.

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  • Work and low pay


    page

    On both the right and left, many view paid employment as the solution to poverty. Work has a range of benefits: it provides not just income but also the chance to improve skills, to develop networks, and the opportunity to act as a good role model for children. However, work does not always prove to be the answer to poverty that many claim it can be.