Working Families

  • Childcare support for working families (NEW)

    Level: Basic

    training course

    This half-day course is for people working in childcare and early years, who want to maximise incomes for working families and help them to avoid common benefit problems.

    It concentrates on who can get help with the costs of childcare through the social security system, and how this interacts with other sources of support. No previous knowledge of benefits is required.

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    Dates:
  • Autumn Statement creates new rationing system for children, working families and disabled people

    December 5, 2013
    press release

    Responding to today’s Autumn Statement, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “Today’s Autumn Statement creates a new income rationing system for children, working families and disabled people through a national cap on their basic support.

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  • CPAG statement on Universal Credit report by Work & Pensions Committee

    April 8, 2014
    press release

    Commenting on the Work & Pensions Committee report on the implementation of  Universal Credit released today, Imran Hussain, Head of Policy of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “This is a deeply troubling report for a flagship benefit which in time will support half of all UK children. The timetable is up in the air, the project management has been all over the place, and its ability to help the low paid is in real jeopardy.

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  • Promoting fairness? Lowering the benefit cap will push more families into poverty

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    This autumn the benefit cap will be cut, squeezing low-income families even further and pushing more people into poverty. The Welfare Reform & Work Act 2016 lowers the cap to £23,000 per annum for families (or £15,410 for single claimants) in London and £20,000 for families (or £13,400 for single claimants) outside of London. There are currently 3.9 million children living in poverty. Projections from the Institute for Fiscal Studies suggests that child poverty could rise by 50 per cent by 2020. Tightening the cap and taking away more support from low-income households will have a devastating effect on families and children.

  • Supporting families

    Issue 135 (Winter 2010)
    article

    Supporting the family is key to both the Government’s and the Conservatives’ approach to eradicating child poverty, and is one of the major issues on which the election is likely to be fought. But are the underlying assumptions about the family that are driving current policies correct, and are they being implemented effectively?

  • Tackle child poverty by letting mums work

    London is the child poverty capital of the UK, with more poor children living in London than in Wales and Scotland combined. These numbers are driven up by a jobs market that is not working for mothers.

  • Zero-hour contracts are wrong type of growth

    April 30, 2014
    press release

    Commenting on new analysis published today by the Office for National Statistics showing the number of zero-hour contract jobs is higher than previously thought, Imran Hussain, Head of Policy, Rights and Advocacy for Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “It’s not enough to look at how much the economy is growing, we need to look at how the economy is changing too. We need a recovery all can share in and which isn’t built on the backs of more working families stuck in low pay or the insecurity of zero-hour contracts.

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