Benefit cap hits children hardest

January 27, 2015

Responding today to reports that the Government wants to impose a more severe benefit cap of £23,000 pa per household, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

“Let’s be absolutely clear. The benefit cap is at least nine times more likely to affect children than adults (1), and the majority of adults it hits are lone parents, many of whom have children so young even the Government recognises they should not be required to work.

“On the day that a major programme of research by academics from leading universities shows families with young children have been more impoverished than anyone else in recent years, we have another policy push that would undercut the most vulnerable.

“Britain is facing a looming child poverty crisis; lowering the benefit cap would bring it several steps closer. It would pile on the misery for working and non-working families already struggling to pay for absolute basics. Surely it would also fail the Prime Minister’s own family test. Rather than taking away money from the poorest, politicians of all parties need to tackle the root causes of higher social security spending which include soaring childcare and housing costs and low pay.”

ENDS

Note to Editors:

(1) 1 DWP Household Benefit Entitlement Equality Impact Assessment -

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/eia-benefit-cap-wr2011.pdf

  • CPAG is the leading charity campaigning for the abolition of child poverty in the UK and for a better deal for low-income families and children.
  • CPAG is the host organisation for the Campaign to End Child Poverty coalition, which has members from across civil society including children’s charities, faith groups, unions and other civic sector organisation, united in their campaigning for public and political commitment to ensure the goal of ending child poverty by 2020 is met.

 

For further information please contact:

Jane Ahrends

CPAG Press and Campaigns Officer

Tel. 020 7812 5216 or 07816 909302

jahrends@cpag.org.uk

www.cpag.org.uk