Celebrating sixty years of the welfare state?

Issue 131 (Autumn 2008)

In the recent celebrations of the sixtieth anniversary of the implementation of the majority of Beveridge’s welfare state reforms, the National Insurance Acts and the National Assistance Act, which together introduced a nationwide system of national insurance and a means-tested safety net, seem to have been forgotten. Fran Bennett looks at what happened.

Unjust rewards

Issue 131 (Autumn 2008)

After months of persuasion and with great difficulty, Polly Toynbee and David Walker managed to assemble focus groups of some of the country’s highest earners. Most of these City merchant bankers and lawyers were in the top 0.1 per cent, earning around £500,000, some up to £10 million, a year. Ipsos Mori had never before managed to assemble such high earners. Here, Polly Toynbee describes the key findings from these focus groups, now published in Unjust Rewards. What did they know and think about Britain’s growing inequality, and the widening gap between themselves and everyone else? Were they uneasy? Did they worry about their children being brought up so isolated from the rest?

Who is fuel poor?

Issue 131 (Autumn 2008)

By June 2008 the domestic fuel commodity price index had increased by 51 per cent from 2005, more than five times the rate of general inflation. The energy companies have warned that prices will rise again – by between a quarter and a third this winter. Harriet Harman told us that she had she spent her week as Acting Prime Minister working on a package of measures to increase the level of investment in energy-saving schemes in low-income housing and exploring other ways to tackle fuel poverty. Here, Jonathan Bradshaw asks who the Government should be targeting.

A decade of debt: lessons for the future

Issue 132 (Winter 2009)

Over the last few months we have seen the gathering clouds of what could provde to be a deep recession. Peter Tutton draws on the debt problems encountered by the CAB service over the last ten years to investigate how the recession might affect future debt problems - particularly for lower income households, and what lessons policy makers might take.

Social mobility in the UK: what does the evidence tell us?

Issue 132 (Winter 2009)

In November 2008 the Prime Minister's Strategy Unit asserted that recent research demonstrated that government policy was improving social mobility in the UK. But what does research actually tell us about the reality of social mobility now or, more correctly since the evidence is always retrospective, in the recent past? David Byrne examines the evidence.

Remembering Peter Townsend

Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

Obituary of Peter Townsend, one of CPAG's founders and our president, born 6 April 1928, died 7 June 2009.

Child poverty and child wellbeing

Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

Enhancing children's lives and improving child wellbeing should be the central objective of any children's policy. But what do we mean by 'wellbeing'? Here, Paul Dornan draws on recently published research from the University of York to explore different aspects of child wellbeing and what they mean for policy in the UK.

Transmitting deprivation? The media and public attitudes towards poverty

Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

Poverty in the UK does not appear to be a priority issue for the mainstream UK media, and the picture of poverty the media does provide is skewed towards certain issues and representations. Building support for the reforms necessary to reduce poverty significantly in the UK requires understanding the influence of the media in shaping public perceptions. Stephen Sinclair and John H McKendrick describe their recent research.

Obituary: Sir Henry Hodge

Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

Obituary of Sir Henry Hodge, 12 January 1944 – 18 June 2009, by Roger Smith, Director, JUSTICE

The Child Poverty Bill: a guide

Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

The Child Poverty Bill was first announced by Gordon Brown in September 2008, and introduced to Parliament in July 2009. Not only does the Bill have the support from all three major political parties, but CPAG and other organisations concerned about child poverty have welcomed it. Paul Dornan outlines what it contains.