Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

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Today’s Guardian covered new analysis by CPAG and IPPR on the impact of cuts to universal credit. This analysis shows that universal credit cuts will hit families with children hardest, and will be poverty-producing to the tune of around a million children (comparing universal credit as originally designed with its current form).

New briefing: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

1 March 2017

Our new briefing examines cuts to universal credit ahead of next week's budget and was covered in today's Guardian.

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Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

March 2017

This briefing presents some of the analysis to be published in a forthcoming report assessing the impacts of cuts to benefits from 2010 to 2020.  This briefing focuses on changes to universal credit since it was first legislated in 2012 and their effects on family incomes, work incentives and poverty rates. It also includes the effect of real-terms cuts to child benefit which took place during the same period.

Developing effective policy to improve job quality

Issue 156 (Winter 2017)

Job quality is back on the UK policy agenda. Indeed, it is back on the policy agenda of many countries’ governments, as well as international governmental bodies. As part of the G20, the UK government signed the 2015 Ankara Declaration that committed the UK and the other member countries to improving job quality with the aim of promoting inclusive growth, creating sustainable growth and reducing inequalities.

Not by pay alone

Issue 156 (Winter 2017)

The idea that child poverty in the UK can only be effectively addressed by a combination of better pay and better state support is not a new one. Here, Donald Hirsch revisits it, arguing that it is folly to rely excessively either on pay or on in-work support to secure acceptable living standards for working families, and suggests how a coherent narrative can be developed about the way they can be combined.

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Britain works: article in Poverty journal

Issue 156 (Winter 2017)

Child Poverty Action Group and Working Families have launched a new project, ‘Britain works’, looking at in-work poverty and how work can be improved for families living on a low income. Here, Jane Mansour sets out the context, examining a range of evidence on the characteristics of low-paid work in Britain today, and reports on what employers say about their policies on and practices towards their low-paid staff.

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Editorial: Poverty 156

Issue 156 (Winter 2017)

In this issue we focus on the world of work. Unemployment is low in the UK, but in-work poverty is at record levels. Debates about the nature and future of work are increasing. What can be done to tackle in-work poverty and the growth in temporary, low-hours and insecure forms of work? What is the relationship between action on pay and security, and increasing productivity? How will the labour market respond to new forms of automation? How can decent jobs be provided in industries where customers increasingly expect low costs and service on demand?

Tax credits, appeals and ‘SLANs’

Issue 256 (February 2017)

Mark Willis reviews recent caselaw about attempted appeals against tax credit ‘notices’ referred to by HMRC as ‘Statements Like an Award Notice’ or SLANs.

Tax credits: child disability element fiasco

Issue 256 (February 2017)

Martin Williams discusses securing child disability elements for the 28,000 families who lost out due to the failure of the DWP to notify HMRC about awards of disability living allowance (DLA).

Universal credit: problems and solutions

Issue 256 (February 2017)

The roll out of the live and now full universal credit (UC) services has highlighted a number of problems. In some cases, these are caused primarily by interpretation of legislation and, in others, by DWP policies and systems. Henri Krishna summarises some of the main problems CPAG has encountered and shares solutions where we have them.