Our policy journal

Published three times a year, Poverty journal carries articles and features to inform, stimulate and develop debate about the nature and causes of poverty. Each issue includes three in-depth features, reviews of latest poverty research, analysis of child poverty statistics, and views from practitioners and young people themselves.

This page contains a selection of articles and editorials from each issue. Access to the full content is part of CPAG’s membership package.

Please note the views expressed in articles are not necessarily those of CPAG. We welcome articles and other contributions from our readers – if you are interested, please contact the editor at jtucker@cpag.org.uk.

  • Supporting families

    Issue 135 (Winter 2010)

    Supporting the family is key to both the Government’s and the Conservatives’ approach to eradicating child poverty, and is one of the major issues on which the election is likely to be fought. But are the underlying assumptions about the family that are driving current policies correct, and are they being implemented effectively?

  • Obituary: Sir Henry Hodge

    Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

    Obituary of Sir Henry Hodge, 12 January 1944 – 18 June 2009, by Roger Smith, Director, JUSTICE

  • The Child Poverty Bill: a guide

    Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

    The Child Poverty Bill was first announced by Gordon Brown in September 2008, and introduced to Parliament in July 2009. Not only does the Bill have the support from all three major political parties, but CPAG and other organisations concerned about child poverty have welcomed it. Paul Dornan outlines what it contains.

  • Tackling in-work poverty

    Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

    A few years ago, the concept of ‘in-work poverty’ was relatively unheard of. When the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) first report on the subject was published in early 2007, the simple statistic that nearly half of all poor children lived in working families was enough to make headlines in nearly every national newspaper. Since then, further work by IPPR, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and others has pushed in-work poverty up the agenda and it is now firmly recognised as a key piece in the poverty puzzle.

  • The costs of compliance

    Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

    Claimants of benefits and tax credits incur a range of costs. These include financial costs, as well as the time and psychological impact associated with making a claim and meeting the various requirements imposed by the Government. Could these costs be taken into account when considering policy changes?

  • Remembering Peter Townsend

    Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

    Obituary of Peter Townsend, one of CPAG's founders and our president, born 6 April 1928, died 7 June 2009.

  • Child poverty and child wellbeing

    Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

    Enhancing children's lives and improving child wellbeing should be the central objective of any children's policy. But what do we mean by 'wellbeing'? Here, Paul Dornan draws on recently published research from the University of York to explore different aspects of child wellbeing and what they mean for policy in the UK.

  • Transmitting deprivation? The media and public attitudes towards poverty

    Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

    Poverty in the UK does not appear to be a priority issue for the mainstream UK media, and the picture of poverty the media does provide is skewed towards certain issues and representations. Building support for the reforms necessary to reduce poverty significantly in the UK requires understanding the influence of the media in shaping public perceptions. Stephen Sinclair and John H McKendrick describe their recent research.

  • Child wellbeing and income inequality in rich countries

    Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

    The wellbeing and behaviour of young people have recently attracted more than the usual negative attention from the media, policy and law.

  • A decade of debt: lessons for the future

    Issue 132 (Winter 2009)

    Over the last few months we have seen the gathering clouds of what could provde to be a deep recession. Peter Tutton draws on the debt problems encountered by the CAB service over the last ten years to investigate how the recession might affect future debt problems - particularly for lower income households, and what lessons policy makers might take.