Press Releases

  • CHILD POVERTY JUMPS TO 4 MILLION

    March 16, 2017

     

    o Child poverty up to 4 million

    o 100,000 more children went into poverty in 2015-16 after housing costs

    o 67% of poor children are in working families

    o Self-employed couples with children have a 30% risk of poverty

    o 47% of lone parents’ children are poor

    o London remains the area with the highest child poverty rate – at 37% (after housing costs) . But excluding housing costs, West Midlands and Northern Ireland have the highest child poverty rates regionally, each at 23%

    o The IFS projects the number of children in relative poverty will rise by 1.2 million to 5.1 million by 2021-22 due to real-terms cuts in tax credits and work allowances. (1)

     

    Responding to the Government’s annual poverty statistics which are published today (2) and show an increase in child poverty for the second year running, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group Alison Garnham said:

     “Today’s figures show that child poverty has increased to 4 million, a level we haven’t seen since 2007-8. The number of poor children in working families has reached 67%. The Prime Minister spoke about injustice on entering Downing Street but there is no greater burning injustice than children being forced into poverty as a result of government policy and no greater damage to our long term prosperity than failing to invest in our children.

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  • BUDGET 2017: NEW LANGUAGE BUT MORE THIN GRUEL FOR STRUGGLING FAMILIES

    March 8, 2017

    Responding to today’s Budget, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said:

     

    “The Budget may have put the next generation first in words, but it was silent on the huge rises in child poverty projected by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (1) over the next five years. Nothing does more to damage the childhoods and life chances of our children than poverty.

     

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  • CHILD POVERTY BILL: TARGETS NEEDED TO DRIVE ACTION

    February 3, 2017

     

     

    Commenting ahead of the second reading today of Dan Jarvis MP’s Private Member’s Bill - Child Poverty in the UK (Target for Reduction) Bill 2016-17 – which places a duty on the Secretary of State to meet four targets for child poverty by a target date (to be specified), Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group said: 

     “Child poverty in the UK is starting to rise for the first time in almost a decade. And IFS projections suggest the rise will be sustained – such that 50% more kids will be under the poverty line by 2020.   Yet we’re operating without binding targets to bring child poverty down because the Child Poverty Act was effectively repealed last year. By contrast, Scotland is in the process of introducing its own child poverty legislation including targets for the elimination of child poverty.

     

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  • CPAG responds to Prime Minister’s ‘shared society’ speech

    January 9, 2017

                    

    The small gains for ‘just managing’ families in today’s Autumn Statement are welcome but for most of these households, they will be dwarfed by the losses they will sustain as a result of Summer 2015 Budget social security cuts:

     The Treasury is briefing that a single parent with one child and no housing costs earning £15,000 per year will gain £170 per year from the lower Universal Credit ‘taper rate’ announced today, but in reality today’s announcement simply means this lone parent will lose £3000 a year, rather than £3,170 a year, as a result of the substantial package of cuts announced in the Summer 2015 Budget.  (1)

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  • CPAG wins Supreme Court bedroom tax breakthrough

    November 9, 2016

    The country’s highest court, the Supreme Court, has ruled that the Government discriminated against a disabled woman and her husband and a severely disabled child who needs overnight care through the implementation of the ‘bedroom tax’.

    The Supreme Court judges dismissed the Government’s appeal in the case of CPAG’s clients Paul and Susan Rutherford who provide around-the-clock care for their disabled grandson and who have a third bedroom for overnight carers.

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  • Response to announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate

    October 31, 2016

    Responding today to the announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said:

    “A London Living Wage rate for 2016-17 of £9.75 is a beacon of good news on a pretty grim horizon for the capital's families. 4 in 10 London children live in poverty, over half of these children live in a family where someone is in work so the London Living Wage provides an important mechanism to reduce in-work poverty in London.

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  • Parents on minimum wage cannot meet basic family costs

    September 22, 2016

    Parents working on the ‘national living wage’ still can’t earn enough to provide an acceptable minimum living standard for their children despite flat (and now falling) inflation and a drop in core household costs like food and energy – even if they both work full-time, warns a new report.

    And lone parents’ living standards have deteriorated faster compared to couple-families, with the gap likely to widen, according to the report from Loughborough University’s Donald Hirsch for Child Poverty Action Group.

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  • EXTENDED SCHOOLS FAILING TO MEET PARENTS’ CHILDCARE NEEDS

    September 14, 2016

    Out-of-school services are failing to match parents’ need for afterschool and holiday childcare a new report (1) from Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) and the Family and Childcare Trust warns.

    Almost two fifths (39%) of schools surveyed for the report said parents wanted holiday provision but only 29% of schools offered this. For afterschool childcare the shortfall was 11 percentage points, with only just over half of schools providing this. The mismatch was biggest in primary schools.

    Drawing on surveys of more than 1,000 head teachers and of 1,200 children, the study found that extended schools are popular with children and schools, but lack of resources was preventing them from expanding.

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